collapse

* User Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

* Search



Author Topic: growing hops  (Read 2278 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Judith

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2015
  • Posts: 4
  • Member Rating 0
growing hops
« on: September 14, 2015, 12:26:47 PM »
I would like to grow my own hops but dont know where to get some hops rhizomes



Online wally

  • ThunderBrew Mash Monkey
  • SA Locals
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 777
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 37
  • MashMonkey
Re: growing hops
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2015, 12:52:02 PM »
What varieties are you after?

Offline Judith

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2015
  • Posts: 4
  • Member Rating 0
Re: growing hops
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2015, 01:11:39 PM »
I would love some galaxy but i would be quite happy with anything else as well
« Last Edit: September 14, 2015, 01:13:59 PM by Judith »

Online wally

  • ThunderBrew Mash Monkey
  • SA Locals
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 777
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 37
  • MashMonkey
Re: growing hops
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2015, 01:34:03 PM »
I would love some galaxy but i would be quite happy with something else as well

Galaxy is a proprietary hop. Therefore out of the realm of the home brewer.

I've decided to get out of growing hops for several reasons, so all of my potted hops are up for grabs.
I have the following available:-

Goldings x 2
Cascade x 2
Hallertau x 2
Pride of Ringwood x 2
Chinook x 1

All are well established and would need to be transplanted into a suitable prepared space or kept in their pots.

Prices, $25 per plant or if you want the pot $55 each. Each bare pot cost me $30 each. Basically I want to use the pots for other plants, so if someone wants a potted hop plant in it's pot, I can replace it.

I also have a few cuttings of Cascade, Chinook and Hallertau (taken last year) that are coming back to life in small pots - $5 each.

I also have a folding trellis arrangement that can be had for $0.00 if you are willing to dig it out of the ground. (500-600 mm deep and concreted in).

Offline Judith

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2015
  • Posts: 4
  • Member Rating 0
Re: growing hops
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2015, 01:50:41 PM »
Wow sounds great could you send me some pictures? How big are the potted plants?

Online wally

  • ThunderBrew Mash Monkey
  • SA Locals
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 777
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 37
  • MashMonkey
Re: growing hops
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2015, 02:02:12 PM »
Each plant has been in it's pot for at least 3 yrs- more for one of the Pride of Ringwood. You could easily divide each into at least 10 viable rhizomes each when dormant. As these are growing now you would need to wait until they are dormant. They should transplant OK if they are removed from the pot with a heap of soil and not disturbed too much or it would probably be better and easier to grab the entire pot.

I assume that you are local. These things are big and heavy. I have a sack truck that I use to move them in their self watering pots.

I'll get some photos later today and post them up.

Online wally

  • ThunderBrew Mash Monkey
  • SA Locals
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 777
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 37
  • MashMonkey
Re: growing hops
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2015, 05:13:22 PM »
Here's some photos of the hops and folding trellis base.

Wally

Top photo: POR and folding trellis base. Pole is 4m tall. when put in place.
Second photo: Hallertau
Third photo: Cascade
Final photo: Cascade from cutting.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2015, 05:17:12 PM by wally »

Offline Judith

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2015
  • Posts: 4
  • Member Rating 0
Re: growing hops
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2015, 07:51:51 PM »
I am interested in one cascade plant with pot- where exactly are you in Adelaide? We just moved here from oversees and dont have a car yet :\

Online wally

  • ThunderBrew Mash Monkey
  • SA Locals
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 777
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 37
  • MashMonkey
Re: growing hops
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2015, 08:25:24 PM »

I am interested in one cascade plant with pot- where exactly are you in Adelaide? We just moved here from oversees and dont have a car yet :

PM sent.

Offline Jack of all biers

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jan 2018
  • Posts: 42
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 3
  • Meister von keinem
Re: growing hops
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2018, 07:30:22 AM »
Rather than starting a new thread, this one seemed appropriate. 

I'm thinking about growing hops, but haven't the last couple of years, because of procrastination about whether it is worth it given I'm on the Adelaide plains.  I'm not sure it is the best climate for growing a quality amount of hops for the hassle of burnt plants etc.  Given purchasing bulk hops makes it fairly inexpensive to buy them, the cost factor is not what I'm about.  Just interested in flavour in the beer and the challenge, but don't want to plant something that will lead to lots of care and even with that fail 50% of the time.

So for the SA hop growers, any tips or advice.  Would I be wasting my time?  Would they get too stressed/burnt during our heat waves and effect production. 

Offline L.W.

  • SA Locals
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Mar 2011
  • Posts: 117
  • Member Rating 5
Re: growing hops
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2018, 10:19:20 AM »
G'day Jack,

You ask a good question, As someone who also lives on the plains (Cumberland Park) and I have been growing hops for about 8 years now and had a go at a few varieties including Hersbrucker, Tardif de Bourgogne, Chinook , Mt Hood, POR, Challenger, Goldings, North Down, Victoria.

The first thing is you have to plan in advance a system of shading your hops like "shade cloth" or they simply will crackle and burn, any day over 35-36C depending on the direct exposure to the sun will effect them.
Also you need air space between the shade cloth and the hops as much as possible at least 500mm minimum.

From my experience on the plains some varieties grow better than others and I think some just don't work for at all.  Most European Varieties are just not worth it in the end the flavour profile is no where near the mark compared to their country of origin.

POR does fairly well, but how often would you really use it? and  if its once or twice a year Just buy it.

I only grow now Chinook, Victoria and Tardif de Bourgogne, and the Tardif I will have one more go at soon and probably remove if its not worth it.  Chinook is a good producer its not the same as US grown hops but I think it has more of a stone fruit character which makes it worth it IMHO.  Victoria is I'm still battling to get flower growth but will persist because you cant buy it and it a unique rewarding flavour.

Sorry for the long post,

hope it helps, Cheers,
L.W.


Online Hatchy

  • SA Locals
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 6754
  • Member Rating 64
  • Non practicing brewer.
Re: growing hops
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2018, 12:25:22 PM »
I only grew hops for a couple of summers and I don't think I ever harvested any. The best thing about mine was that they provided sensational shade at those houses. If you have a west facing verandah then hops are a great way to keep the afternoon sun out even if you never bother to harvest any hops.
I have nothing interesting to add here.

Offline Jack of all biers

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jan 2018
  • Posts: 42
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 3
  • Meister von keinem
Re: growing hops
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2018, 09:01:22 PM »
So thanks for the reply posts a while back. I'm only a couple of km's from Cumberland Park, so that advice was great to hear.

I'm replying now, as I have a rhizome (Victoria) from DrSmurto which is in damp newspaper in the fridge and today I dug the soil and put in worm castings (from my worm farm), a bag of garden soil (the spot I have chosen is very sandy) and some rotted chicken manure (from my chooks).  I was thinking to leave the soil to work itself in over winter and then add some compost I picked up today prior to planting.....  And then I realised I didn't ask Mark when I should plant it.  Or maybe I did, but have forgotten, as I remember he did say it would be too late unless planting in a pot or there was good drainage due to the possibility of rot.  Mark, I changed my mind. It's going in the ground, I'm all in! 

Planting in spring is what the literature says (I've read the NSW Gov doc on growing hops for new growers).  But, given there are growers on the Adelaide plains, I thought I'd ask, what period is best?  Mid or late-winter or now given the soil is very sandy in that spot (pretty sure about a metre down it's clay/loam, but I only dug in 50cm so am not sure).

Any and all advice that is region specific (or even not) would be much appreciated.

Offline fewbrew

  • SA Locals
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2017
  • Posts: 120
  • Member Rating 2
Re: growing hops
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2018, 03:26:08 PM »
Jack,

Well drained soil is good for hops, stops the roots rotting in winter. That NSW DPI document is a good source for info. If its sand based make sure it has some organic matter. You could mix some coir in if you don't have access to compost. I didn't have much luck this season with heat, they got burnt. Got an early crop off the cluster that was good and a heaps of POR later. But they were not ideal. I will mulch heaps more this year and follow advice of raising shade cloth. Jack let me know if you want some more rhizomes? Not to far away.

Cheers.

Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk


Offline Jack of all biers

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jan 2018
  • Posts: 42
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 3
  • Meister von keinem
Re: growing hops
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2018, 11:47:31 PM »
Thanks Few brew.  Really kind offer.  I think I'll give one plant a go for the first season.  I am interested in getting hops from it, but want to trial the whole thing first rather than overload myself with shade cloth, wires, training, etc.  Baby steps.  I have been known to kill plants with too much love (read too much watering or messing with the soil to much).  So you think it may be okay to plant now or rather wait for mid-winter, late winter or spring?

Offline fewbrew

  • SA Locals
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2017
  • Posts: 120
  • Member Rating 2
Re: growing hops
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2018, 08:14:54 AM »
I would stick to your plan of letting the soil do its thing and plant late winter. Should be a good time with our Mediterranean weather, much warmer climate than what the sources refer too. Remember there is plenty of free bagged horse poo at morphetville. Not that high in npk, but will put plenty of organic matter in sandy soil.

Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk


Offline Jack of all biers

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jan 2018
  • Posts: 42
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 3
  • Meister von keinem
Re: growing hops
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2018, 11:34:21 AM »
Cheers mate, late winter it is.  Thanks for the tip about Morphettville too, I was not aware.

Offline Jack of all biers

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jan 2018
  • Posts: 42
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Member Rating 3
  • Meister von keinem
Re: growing hops
« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2018, 01:59:38 PM »
So I decided to give my soil a bit of a deeper go and dig up the clay to break it down a bit for better deep root growth.  I dug out the top soil I had already dug over and found it was only about 300-400mm deep and the sandy part I had initially dug was not representative of the rest of the top soil which was more a sandy loam (someone, must have put a fair bit of sand in that spot at one time.  Used to be an orange tree there). 

I put the top soil to one side and dug out about 1x1 metre hole to a depth of 500mm putting the clay (sandy/gritty clay) on a tarp separate from the rest.  I dug a post hole to about a metre until I hit river bed stones (smooth from an ancient creek or river) to loosen up an area for the tap roots to go.  I tested this clay and found the pH of about 7-7.2.  I then sprinkled gypsum on it and chipped (lightly with a pick) that into the bottom of the now hole I had dug.  I mixed the removed clay with some of the sandy/loam top soil, gypsum and Brunnings 'Professional' compost and returned it to the hole.   I sprinkled some rainwater on it and left it, as it was getting dark.

This morning, I tested the pH of the mixture and it was up around the 8-8.5 mark.  WTF I thought.  I then tested the 'Professional' compost and found it was pH of 8.5-9!  What 'Professional' would use that?  The worst thing about this, is I've been stung before with some bagged cow manure I bought once that also had been limed to death (I assume the chip bark and some lime are the reasons in this case however).  Why I didn't test the compost prior to using it will bug me for sometime, no doubt.

So I'm off today to get some of that free horse manure you mentioned, in the hope that I can mix it with the bought compost and allow it to bring the ridiculous pH value it currently is down.  As far as the hole goes, I'm thinking that a 100gm of sulphur might have to be added to counteract the compost.  Problem with sulphur is it can take a while to work, but given I won't be planting for a couple of months and this is the sub-soil, not the first 300mm it might give enough time for the sulphur to work its' magic. 

Thoughts?  Have I overlooked something? (such as the buffering capability of the clay to bring the pH back given enough time or that sulphur might be bad for hops?)
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 02:07:05 PM by Jack of all biers »

Offline fewbrew

  • SA Locals
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2017
  • Posts: 120
  • Member Rating 2
Re: growing hops
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2018, 02:26:02 PM »
So I decided to give my soil a bit of a deeper go and dig up the clay to break it down a bit for better deep root growth.  I dug out the top soil I had already dug over and found it was only about 300-400mm deep and the sandy part I had initially dug was not representative of the rest of the top soil which was more a sandy loam (someone, must have put a fair bit of sand in that spot at one time.  Used to be an orange tree there). 

I put the top soil to one side and dug out about 1x1 metre hole to a depth of 500mm putting the clay (sandy/gritty clay) on a tarp separate from the rest.  I dug a post hole to about a metre until I hit river bed stones (smooth from an ancient creek or river) to loosen up an area for the tap roots to go.  I tested this clay and found the pH of about 7-7.2.  I then sprinkled gypsum on it and chipped (lightly with a pick) that into the bottom of the now hole I had dug.  I mixed the removed clay with some of the sandy/loam top soil, gypsum and Brunnings 'Professional' compost and returned it to the hole.   I sprinkled some rainwater on it and left it, as it was getting dark.

This morning, I tested the pH of the mixture and it was up around the 8-8.5 mark.  WTF I thought.  I then tested the 'Professional' compost and found it was pH of 8.5-9!  What 'Professional' would use that?  The worst thing about this, is I've been stung before with some bagged cow manure I bought once that also had been limed to death (I assume the chip bark and some lime are the reasons in this case however).  Why I didn't test the compost prior to using it will bug me for sometime, no doubt.

So I'm off today to get some of that free horse manure you mentioned, in the hope that I can mix it with the bought compost and allow it to bring the ridiculous pH value it currently is down.  As far as the hole goes, I'm thinking that a 100gm of sulphur might have to be added to counteract the compost.  Problem with sulphur is it can take a while to work, but given I won't be planting for a couple of months and this is the sub-soil, not the first 300mm it might give enough time for the sulphur to work its' magic. 

Thoughts?  Have I overlooked something? (such as the buffering capability of the clay to bring the pH back given enough time or that sulphur might be bad for hops?)
This could be one for the resident chemist?

Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk