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Author Topic: Beer Stability in kegs  (Read 188 times)

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Beer Stability in kegs
« on: December 07, 2017, 06:49:25 PM »
Guessing we all have this problem with home brewed and kegged beer but, I am wondering if there is any way around it.

Flavour stability in kegged beer seems to be difficult to achieve. Assuming unfiltered beer which I think includes most of us, the first litre out is usually very cloudy and discarded. The next few litres are somewhat hazy and flavousome followed by clearer but, less flavoursome beer.

This is obviously unacceptable for any beer being sold, where it's expected the beer tastes the same from the first pint to the last but is something that certainly eludes me.

Big guys have worked it out but how do the smaller guys go - Left Barrel for example but includes any nano-micro brewery.


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Offline punkin

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Re: Beer Stability in kegs
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2017, 03:54:20 AM »
Seems to be the opposite to me. The beer is good from day one, then just as it's at it's peak the keg blows.

Sometimes a beer will taste so good that i know the keg will blow within a pint or two.
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Re: Beer Stability in kegs
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2017, 09:19:56 AM »
I naturally carb pretty much all my kegged beers (unless I need a keg quickly - then it's force carbed and usually consumed at a festival or similar in no time).

Some beers drop bright in primary, others less so - for me this is more on which conical I'm using. The lower I can get the temp the brighter the beer.

Flavour stability though... I believe hopped beers need consuming quicker than brett beers and lagers. And keep them as cold as possible once carbed up in the keg.
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Re: Beer Stability in kegs
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2017, 10:01:31 AM »
I'm starting to think that cold storage might be the problem. I store my kegged beer at 0°C and carefully move it to the keggerator.

What I might do from now on is to take off the first litre of cloudy, yeasty beer and then invert it before moving it to the keggerator. I am finding that not only do the hop flavours and bitterness tend to flocculate but malt flavours do as well. Sometimes these kegs are stored for many weeks at 0°C so plenty of time for stratification.
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Re: Beer Stability in kegs
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2017, 11:20:24 AM »
I have experienced this myself Labels and given it much thought.
All speculation, but I was wondering if it is a result of the early stages of oxidisation.  I've had a few lagers lose their malt profile within a week of kegging and wondered if this was the flavour settling or changing.
My plan for an experiment would be to bottle a beer in it's early malty stage. Then when the keg seems to lose its flavour, crack the bottle and see if it still has it.
Helping to understand whether or not it has settled out or it has aged away.
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Re: Beer Stability in kegs
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2017, 01:20:28 PM »
I believe that CO2 can assist in stripping out flavours in kegs although I have never read anything scientific about it, only that it's suspected.
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Re: Beer Stability in kegs
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2017, 04:02:39 PM »
Can't see how CO2 in a keg strips flavour but not in a bottle.

If you want to see if it's oxidation in kegs, do a split batch and add 100mg/L of potassium metabisulfite to one.

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